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  #1  
Old 27th August 2009, 19:39
G-CPTN G-CPTN is offline  
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Austin Champ.

As a result of following URLs about Austin Sheerlines, I have had a misconception 'destroyed'. I always thought that the Rolls Royce engine fitted to the Van den Plas 4-litre R was also the engine fitted to the Austin Champ.
In fact that is not true. Although the Champ engine (at least in the military versions) was, indeed, designed (and originally built) by Rolls Royce, this was a mere 2.8 litre capacity and was only four cylinders whereas the car engine was six cylinders.
True that the basic B-series engine design was common, but the 4-litre engine was cast in aluminium (and, is, apparently, a fine engine - if meticulously maintained) and had altered stroke:-
http://www.redlemon.co.za/vandenplasprincess/rolls.html

However, the purpose of this thread is to expand knowledge of the Champ (after all, this forum is dedicated to trucks and buses rather than passenger cars).
I'll start with the Wiki entry:-
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austin_Champ
and invite others to contribute links to photographs or text articles.

You might want to search for the Wolseley Mudlark . . .

http://enc.slq.qld.gov.au/slq/neg/pr...00/116058p.jpg

If there is little (or no) response, then I might have to contribute myself.

Oh - and if you have already read the above Wiki link, you will know that most of the civilian Champs were fitted with the 2.66 litre Austin Atlantic engine . . .

Then there was the Austin Gipsy.

Last edited by G-CPTN; 27th August 2009 at 19:51.
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Old 31st August 2009, 10:55
Western SMT Western SMT is offline  
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From what I remember of them they were not looked upon favourably (oil leaks I think) and the cheaper Land Rover soon became popular.

Last edited by Western SMT; 31st August 2009 at 12:53.
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  #3  
Old 31st August 2009, 11:46
G-CPTN G-CPTN is offline  
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Indeed - they lost oil from the axles (hubs?) and that destroyed the gears.

As you stated, the Land Rover did 90% of the jobs that the Champ could at half the price (and cheaper on maintenance).

Champ was too 'sophisticated'.
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Old 31st August 2009, 12:21
coastie coastie is offline  
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Austin Champ! Now there's a name I haven't heard of for a while. I'm not familiar with those at all.
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Old 31st August 2009, 20:46
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dmackay dmackay is offline  
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Anyone remember the Austin Gipsy (drive shafts )
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Old 31st August 2009, 23:07
coastie coastie is offline  
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Very vaguely!!
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Old 31st August 2009, 23:25
G-CPTN G-CPTN is offline  
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Quote:
The Gipsy was visually similar to the Land Rover, but unlike the Land Rover, the Gipsy's bodywork was steel and suffered badly from rust in the outdoors off-road environment it was intended for. The suspension was sophisticated - independent suspension all round, using 'Flexitor' rubber springs. Later models used leaf springs on the front and rear which was felt to offer a greatly improved ride over rough surfaces.
From:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austin_Gipsy
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Old 1st September 2009, 11:28
coastie coastie is offline  
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What is a Landrovers' body made of then?
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Old 1st September 2009, 11:34
G-CPTN G-CPTN is offline  
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Aluminium . . .
Quote:
The bodywork was hand-made out of surplus aircraft grade aluminium, mainly an aluminium/magnesium alloy called Birmabright, to save on steel, which was closely rationed.
More at:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_Rover_Series
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Old 1st September 2009, 12:23
coastie coastie is offline  
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But, I thought you could weld onto a Landrover body??
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